Educated Negro Syndrome (ENS)

EDUCATED NEGRO SYNDROME

November 29, 2012 by speakwhenspokento

This post has been a long, long, time coming. Many of you will be upset with me for this post. And by many, I mean maybe, 4 or 5 of the 10 people that read my blog.

I would like to explain my theory of “Educated Negro Syndrome”, or ENS. Now, before you write me off about being misled and ignorant by using the word “Negro,” let me explain myself. From my own understanding and from what I’ve learned throughout the years in school and listening to stories of my ancestors, the word Negro began as a way to describe African Americans. Negro is yet another word that my people changed into a term of endearment when it had been meant to separate us from whites. It was another string on America’s guitar that forever plays the sweet song of racism, but, we digress.

I choose to use the word Negro to explain my theory because it describes an ideology carried by my brown brothers when they feel they have arrived in this world. There is a certain air that is created when these aforementioned brothers feel they have been enlightened enough to be separated from the rest of their brown sisters and brothers. This is not a generalization. This theory describes a select few young men that I’ve been encountering more and more frequently.

There have been many times when I log on to Twitter to see some young, educated black man talking about why he hates when black women wear weaves. This is not the only instance to explain my theory, but it is the most common, so I will use this as the primary example.

I’d say the way black men now feel about weaves on black women had something to do with the natural hair movement sweeping the nation among black women. We as women, especially, single, black women, are always dying to find ways to make ourselves more attractive to men, so that we can get married, and live happily ever after. Anyway, I have seen these same men that are so down on hair extensions and make-up, chase these same women in the clubs, bars, nightlife scene, etc. I have had debates with these men about how I must hate myself for putting some European or East Indian’s hair in my head instead of my own and have watched them flirt with women who replicate the very image they have done such a good job at critiquing. I don’t blame you guys, this is just a symptom of ENS.

These men have studied Freud, and Plato and historical philosophers, in addition to being able to quote W.E.B. Dubois and Booker T. Washington but when they see a Kim Kardashian look-a-like, they can barely contain themselves. Which is it, young sir? Do you even know or have you been so brainwashed by those history books and reality shows that you don’t even know yourself? I’d like to suggest the latter.

Read more here: http://speakwhenspokento.wordpress.com/2012/11/29/educated-negro-syndrome/

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First Trayvon, Now Jordan … Is This Genocide?

White Man Shoots And Kills Black Student In Florida After Argument Over Loud Music

By Scott Keyes on Nov 27, 2012 at 4:00 pm

Less than nine months after Trayvon Martin was shot and killed in central Florida, another black teenage student was killed under suspicious circumstances.

https://i2.wp.com/thinkprogress.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/Jordan-Russell-Davis.jpg

Michael David Dunn, a 45-year-old vice president of Dunn & Dunn Data Systems in Vero Beach, was in Jacksonville this past weekend for his son’s wedding. The Orlando Sentinel details what happened on Friday when Dunn, a gun collector, encountered Jordan Russell Davis, a student at nearby magnet school Samuel W. Wolfson High:

Jordan Russell Davis, 17, and several other teenagers were sitting in a sport utility vehicle in the parking lot when Dunn pulled up next to them in a car and asked them to turn down their music, [Jacksonville sheriff’s Lt. Rob] Schoonover said.

Jordan and Dunn exchanged words, and Dunn pulled a gun and shot eight or nine times, striking Jordan twice, Schoonover said. Jordan was sitting in the back seat. No one else was hurt. Dunn’s attorney Monday said her client acted responsibly and in self-defense. She did not elaborate.

Schoonover also said that “there were words exchanged” between the two, and Dunn claims to have felt “threatened” before opening fire.

According to his father Ron Davis, the teenager died in the arms of his friend in the car. Ron said his son was unarmed.

Dunn was arrested at his home on Saturday and charged with murder and attempted murder. He is being held without bail.

Davis’s funeral will take place on Saturday, Dec. 1 and his parents plan to create a foundation “for at risk students that suffer from tragedies, in his memory.”

Since Dunn is claiming self-defense, Florida’s “Stand Your Ground” law, which earned infamy after Trayvon Martin’s killing, could be at issue in this case. After Martin’s death, Florida Gov. Rick Scott (R) appointed a task force to review the law that authorizes the unfettered use of deadly force in self-defense, but the panel didn’t recommend any significant changes.

The Real TRUTH Behind Thanksgiving

THE REAL STORY OF THANKSGIVING

Most of us associate the holiday with happy Pilgrims and Indians sitting down to a big feast. And that did happen – once.

The story began in 1614 when a band of English explorers sailed home to England with a ship full of Patuxet Indians bound for slavery. They left behind smallpox which virtually wiped out those who had escaped. By the time the Pilgrims arrived in Massachusetts Bay they found only one living Patuxet Indian, a man named Squanto who had survived slavery in England and knew their language. He taught them to grow corn and to fish, and negotiated a peace treaty between the Pilgrims and the Wampanoag Nation. At the end of their first year, the Pilgrims held a great feast honoring Squanto and the Wampanoags.

But as word spread in England about the paradise to be found in the new world, religious zealots called Puritans began arriving by the boat load. Finding no fences around the land, they considered it to be in the public domain. Joined by other British settlers, they seized land, capturing strong young Natives for slaves and killing the rest. But the Pequot Nation had not agreed to the peace treaty Squanto had negotiated and they fought back. The Pequot War was one of the bloodiest Indian wars ever fought.

In 1637 near present day Groton, Connecticut, over 700 men, women and children of the Pequot Tribe had gathered for their annual Green Corn Festival which is our Thanksgiving celebration. In the predawn hours the sleeping Indians were surrounded by English and Dutch mercenaries who ordered them to come outside. Those who came out were shot or clubbed to death while the terrified women and children who huddled inside the longhouse were burned alive. The next day the governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony declared “A Day Of Thanksgiving” because 700 unarmed men, women and children had been murdered.

Cheered by their “victory”, the brave colonists and their Indian allies attacked village after village. Women and children over 14 were sold into slavery while the rest were murdered. Boats loaded with a many as 500 slaves regularly left the ports of New England. Bounties were paid for Indian scalps to encourage as many deaths as possible.

Following an especially successful raid against the Pequot in what is now Stamford, Connecticut, the churches announced a second day of “thanksgiving” to celebrate victory over the heathen savages. During the feasting, the hacked off heads of Natives were kicked through the streets like soccer balls. Even the friendly Wampanoag did not escape the madness. Their chief was beheaded, and his head impaled on a pole in Plymouth, Massachusetts — where it remained on display for 24 years.

The killings became more and more frenzied, with days of thanksgiving feasts being held after each successful massacre. George Washington finally suggested that only one day of Thanksgiving per year be set aside instead of celebrating each and every massacre. Later Abraham Lincoln decreed Thanksgiving Day to be a legal national holiday during the Civil War — on the same day he ordered troops to march against the starving Sioux in Minnesota.

This story doesn’t have quite the same fuzzy feelings associated with it as the one where the Indians and Pilgrims are all sitting down together at the big feast. But we need to learn our true history so it won’t ever be repeated. Next Thanksgiving, when you gather with your loved ones to Thank God for all your blessings, think about those people who only wanted to live their lives and raise their families. They, also took time out to say “thank you” to Creator for all their blessings.
Source: http://www.manataka.org/page269.html

White Trash!

This Is Beyond Sad: 2 Ignorant Students At The University Of Minnesota Take A L For This!

***In the title of this video these student are called ignorant which means lacking knowledge but the girls know exactly know what they’re doing. This is blatant racism! Why?! If I could ask them why I would. This was extremely disturbing for me to watch. I looked at it for about 4 seconds and listened to the rest of it. Maybe you have enough in you to watch this idiocy. (their employers (and whoever else could be notified) were all contacted about this video.) ***

Hip-Hop is Killing Us!

Bell Hooks breaks “Rap Music” down. Bell Hooks says enough with this Patriarchy, Misogyny, Class, Race and Booty Shaking!

Sexism and Misogyny: Who Takes the Rap?

Misogyny, gangsta rap, and The Piano

By bell hooks

For the past several months white mainstream media has been calling me to hear my views on gangsta rap. Whether major television networks, or small independent radio shows, they seek me out for the black and feminist “take” on the issue. After I have my say, I am never called back, never invited to do the television shows or the radio spots. I suspect they call, confident that when we talk they will hear the hardcore “feminist” trash of gangsta rap. When they encounter instead the hardcore feminist critique of white supremacist capitalist patriarchy, they lose interest.

To white dominated mass media, the controversy over gangsta rap makes great spectacle. Besides the exploitation of these issues to attract audiences, a central motivation for highlighting gangsta rap continues to be the sensationalist drama of demonizing black youth culture in general and the contributions of young black men in particular. It is a contemporary remake of “Birth of a Nation” only this time we are encouraged to believe it is not just vulnerable white womanhood that risks destruction by black hands but everyone. When I counter this demonization of black males by insisting that gangsta rap does not appear in a cultural vacuum, but, rather, is expressive of the cultural crossing, mixings, and engagement of black youth culture with the values, attitudes, and concerns of the white majority, some folks stop listening.

The sexist, misogynist, patriarchal ways of thinking and behaving that are glorified in gangsta rap are a reflection of the prevailing values in our society, values created and sustained by white supremacist capitalist patriarchy. As the crudest and most brutal expression of sexism, misogynistic attitudes tend to be portrayed by the dominant culture as an expression of male deviance. In reality they are part of a sexist continuum, necessary for the maintenance of patriarchal social order. While patriarchy and sexism continue to be the political and cultural norm in our society, feminist movement has created a climate where crude expressions of male domination are called into question, especially if they are made by men in power. It is useful to think of misogyny as a field that must be labored in and maintained both to sustain patriarchy but also to serve as an ideological anti-feminist backlash. And what better group to labor on this “plantation” than young black men.

 

To see gangsta rap as a reflection of dominant values in our culture rather than as an aberrant “pathological” standpoint does not mean that a rigorous feminist critique of the sexist and misogyny expressed in this music is not needed. Without a doubt black males, young and old, must be held politically accountable for their sexism. Yet this critique must always be contextualized or we risk making it appear that the behaviors this thinking supports and condones,–rape, male violence against women, etc.– is a black male thing. And this is what is happening. Young black males are forced to take the “heat” for encouraging, via their music, the hatred of and violence against women that is a central core of patriarchy.

Witness the recent piece by Brent Staples in the “New York Times” titled “The Politics of Gangster Rap: A Music Celebrating Murder and Misogyny.” Defining the turf Staples writes: “For those who haven’t caught up, gangster rap is that wildly successful music in which all women are `bitches’ and `whores’ and young men kill each other for sport.” No mention of white supremacist capitalist patriarchy in this piece, not a word about the cultural context that would need to exist for young males to be socialized to think differently about gender. Staples assumes that black males are writing their lyrics off in the “jungle,” away from the impact of mainstream socialization and desire. At no point in his piece does he ask why huge audiences, especially young white male consumers, are so turned on by this music, by the misogyny and sexism, by the brutality? Where is the anger and rage at females expressed in this music coming from, the glorification of all acts of violence? These are the difficult questions that Staples feels no need to answer.

One cannot answer them honestly without placing accountability on larger structures of domination and the individuals (often white, usually male but not always) who are hierarchically placed to maintain and perpetuate the values that uphold these exploitative and oppressive systems. That means taking a critical looking at the politics of hedonistic consumerism, the values of the men and women who produce gangsta rap. It would mean considering the seduction of young black males who find that they can make more money producing lyrics that promote violence, sexism, and misogyny than with any other content. How many disenfranchised black males would not surrender to expressing virulent forms of sexism, if they knew the rewards would be unprecedented material power and fame?

 

More than anything gangsta rap celebrates the world of the “material, ” the dog-eat-dog world where you do what you gotta do to make it. In this world view killing is necessary for survival. Significantly, the logic here is a crude expression of the logic of white supremacist capitalist patriarchy. In his new book “Sexy Dressing, Etc.” privileged white male law professor Duncan Kennedy gives what he calls “a set of general characterizations of U. S. culture” explaining that, “It is individual (cowboys), material (gangsters) and philistine.” Using this general description of mainstream culture would lead us to place “gangsta rap” not on the margins of what this nation is about, but at the center. Rather than being viewed as a subversion or disruption of the norm we would need to see it as an embodiment of the norm.

That viewpoint was graphically highlighted in the film “Menace To Society” which dramatized not only young black males killing for sport, but also mass audiences voyeuristically watching and, in many cases, “enjoying” the kill. Significantly, at one point in the movie we see that the young black males have learned their “gangsta” values from watching television and movies–shows where white male gangsters are center stage. This scene undermines any notion of “essentialist” blackness that would have viewers believe the gangsterism these young black males embraced emerged from some unique black cultural experience.

When I interviewed rap artist Ice Cube for “Spin” magazine last year, he talked about the importance of respecting black women and communication across gender. He spoke against male violence against women, even as he lapsed into a justification for anti- woman rap lyrics by insisting on the madonna/whore split where some females “carry” themselves in a manner that determines how they will be treated. When this interview was published, it was cut to nothing. It was a mass media set-up. Folks (mostly white and male) had thought if the hardcore feminist talked with the hardened black man, sparks would fly; there would be a knock-down drag out spectacle. When Brother Cube and I talked to each other with respect about the political, spiritual, and emotional self- determination of black people, it did not make good copy. Clearly folks at the magazine did not get the darky show they were looking for.

After this conversation, and talking with rappers and folks who listen to rap, it became clear that while black male sexism is a serious problem in our communities and in black music, some of the more misogynist lyrics were there to stir up controversy and appeal to audiences. Nowhere is this more evident that in Snoop Doggy Dogg’s record “Doggystyle”. A black male music and cultural critic called me to ask if I had checked this image out; to share that for one of the first times in his music buying life he felt he was seeing an image so offensive in its sexism and misogyny that he did not want to take that image home. That image (complete with doghouse, beware the dog sign, with a naked black female head in a doghouse, naked butt sticking out) was reproduced, “uncritically,” in the November 29, 1993 issue of “Time” magazine. The positive music review of this album, written by Christopher John Farley, is titled “Gangsta Rap, Doggystyle” makes no mention of sexism and misogyny, makes no reference to the cover. I wonder if a naked white female body had been inside the doghouse, presumably waiting to be fucked from behind, if “Time” would have reproduced an image of the cover along with their review. When I see the pornographic cartoon that graces the cover of “Doggystyle,” I do not think simply about the sexism and misogyny of young black men, I think about the sexist and misogynist politics of the powerful white adult men and women (and folks of color) who helped produce and market this album.

In her book “Misogynies” Joan Smith shares her sense that while most folks are willing to acknowledge unfair treatment of women, discrimination on the basis of gender, they are usually reluctant to admit that hatred of women is encouraged because it helps maintain the structure of male dominance. Smith suggests: “Misogyny wears many guises, reveals itself in different forms which are dictated by class, wealth, education, race, religion and other factors, but its chief characteristic is its pervasiveness.” This point reverberated in my mind when I saw Jane Campion’s widely acclaimed film “The Piano” which I saw in the midst of mass media focus on sexism and misogyny in “gangsta rap.” I had been told by many friends in the art world that this was “an incredible film, a truly compelling love story etc.” Their responses were echoed by numerous positive reviews. No one speaking about this film mentions misogyny and sexism or white supremacist capitalist patriarchy.

The 19th century world of the white invasion of New Zealand is utterly romanticized in this film (complete with docile happy darkies–Maori natives–who appear to have not a care in the world). And when the film suggests they care about white colonizers digging up the graves of their dead ancestors, it is the sympathetic poor white male who comes to the rescue. Just as the conquest of natives and lands is glamorized in this film, so is the conquest of femininity, personified by white womanhood, by the pale speechless corpse-like Scotswoman, Ada, who journeys into this dark wilderness because her father has arranged for her to marry the white colonizer Stewart. Although mute, Ada expresses her artistic ability, the intensity of her vision and feelings through piano playing. This passion attracts Baines, the illiterate white settler who wears the facial tattoos of the Maori–an act of appropriation that makes him (like the traditional figure of Tarzan) appear both dangerous and romantic. He is Norman Mailer’s “white negro,” seducing Ada by promising to return the piano that Steward has exchanged with him for land. The film leads us to believe that Ada’s passionate piano playing has been a substitution for repressed eroticism. When she learns to let herself go sexually, she ceases to need the piano. We watch the passionate climax of Baines seduction as she willingly seeks him sexually. And we watch her husband Stewart in the role of voyeur, standing with dog outside the cabin where they fuck, voyeuristically consuming their pleasure. Rather than being turned off by her love for Baines, it appears to excite Stewart’s passion; he longs to possess her all the more. Unable to win her back from Baines, he expresses his rage, rooted in misogyny and sexism, by physically attacking her and chopping off her finger with an ax. This act of male violence takes place with Ada’s daughter, Flora, as a witness. Though traumatized by the violence she witnesses, she is still about to follow the white male patriarch’s orders and take the bloody finger to Baines, along with the message that each time he sees Ada she will suffer physical mutilation.

Violence against land, natives, and women in this film, unlike that of gangsta rap, is portrayed uncritically, as though it is “natural,” the inevitable climax of conflicting passions. The outcome of this violence is positive. Ultimately, the film suggests Stewart’s rage was only an expression of irrational sexual jealousy, that he comes to his senses and is able to see “reason.” In keeping with male exchange of women, he gives Ada and Flora to Baines. They leave the wilderness. On the voyage home Ada demands that her piano be thrown overboard because it is “soiled,” tainted with horrible memories. Surrendering it she lets go of her longing to display passion through artistic expression. A nuclear family now, Baines, Ada, and Flora resettle and live happily-ever-after. Suddenly, patriarchal order is restored. Ada becomes a modest wife, wearing a veil over her mouth so that no one will see her lips struggling to speak words. Flora has no memory of trauma and is a happy child turning somersaults. Baines is in charge, even making Ada a new finger.

“The Piano “seduces and excites audiences with its uncritical portrayal of sexism and misogyny. Reviewers and audiences alike seem to assume that Campion’s gender, as well as her breaking of traditional boundaries that inhibit the advancement of women in film, indicate that her work expresses a feminist standpoint. And, indeed, she does employ feminist “tropes,” even as her work betrays feminist visions of female actualization, celebrates and eroticizes male domination. In Smith’s discussion of misogyny she emphasizes that woman-hating is not solely the province of men: “We are all exposed to the prevailing ideology of our culture, and some women learn early on that they can prosper by aping the misogyny of men; these are the women who win provisional favor by denigrating other women, by playing on male prejudices, and by acting the `man’s woman’.” Since this is not a documentary film that needs to remain faithful to the ethos of its historical setting, why is it that Campion does not resolve Ada’s conflicts by providing us with an imaginary landscape where a woman can express passionate artistic commitment and find fulfillment in a passionate relationship? This would be no more far-fetched than her cinematic portrayal of Ada’s miraculous transformation from muteness into speech. Ultimately, Campion’s “The Piano” advances the sexist assumption that heterosexual women will give up artistic practice to find “true love.” That “positive” surrender is encouraged by the “romantic” portrayal of sexism and misogyny.

While I do not think that young black male rappers have been rushing in droves to see “The Piano”, there is a bond between those folks involved with high culture who celebrate and condone the sexist ideas and values upheld in this film and those who celebrate and condone “gangsta rap.” Certainly Kennedy’s description of the United States as a “cowboy, gangster, philistine” culture would also accurately describe the culture evoked in “The Piano”. Popular movies that are seen by young black males, for example “Indecent Proposal, MadDog and Glory, True Romance”, and “One False Move”, all eroticize male domination expressed via the exchange of women, as well as the subjugation of other men, through brutal violence.

Contrary to a racist white imagination which assumes that most young black males, especially those who are poor, live in a self- created cultural vacuum, uninfluenced by mainstream, cultural values, it is the application of those values, largely learned through passive uncritical consumption of mass media, that is revealed in “gangsta rap.” Brent Staples is willing to challenge the notion that “urban primitivism is romantic” when it suggests that black males become “real men” by displaying the will to do violence, yet he remains resolutely silent about that world of privileged white culture that has historically romanticized primitivism, and eroticized male violence. Contemporary films like “Reservoir Dogs” and “The Bad Lieutenant” celebrate urban primitivism and many less well done films (“Trespass, Rising Sun”) create and/or exploit the cultural demand for depictions of hardcore blacks who are willing to kill for sport.

To take “gangsta rap” to task for its sexism and misogyny while critically accepting and perpetuating those expressions of that ideology which reflect bourgeois standards (no rawness, no vulgarity) is not to call for a transformation of the culture of patriarchy. Ironically, many black male ministers, themselves sexist and misogynist, are leading the attacks against gangsta rap. Like the mainstream world that supports white supremacist capitalist patriarchy, they are most concerned with calling attention to the vulgar obscene portrayals of women to advance the cause of censorship. For them, rethinking and challenging sexism, both in the dominant culture and in black life, is not the issue.

Mainstream white culture is not concerned about black male sexism and misogyny, particularly when it is unleashed against black women and children. It is concerned when young white consumers utilize black popular culture to disrupt bourgeois values. Whether it be the young white boy who expresses his rage at his mother by aping black male vernacular speech (a true story) or the masses of young white males (and middle class men of color) seeking to throw off the constraints of bourgeois bondage who actively assert in their domestic households via acts of aggression their rejection of the call to be “civilized. ” These are the audiences who feel such a desperate need for gangsta rap. It is much easier to attack gangsta rap than to confront the culture that produces that need.

Gangsta rap is part of the anti-feminist backlash that is the rage right now. When young black males labor in the plantations of misogyny and sexism to produce gangsta rap, their right to speak this violence and be materially rewarded is extended to them by white supremacist capitalist patriarchy. Far from being an expression of their “manhood,” it is an expression of their own subjugation and humiliation by more powerful, less visible forces of patriarchal gangsterism. They give voice to the brutal raw anger and rage against women that it is taboo for “civilized” adult men to speak. No wonder then that they have the task of tutoring the young, teaching them to eroticize and enjoy the brutal expressions of that rage (teaching them language and acts) before they learn to cloak it in middle-class decorum or Robert Bly style reclaimings of lost manhood. The tragedy for young black males is that they are so easily dunned by a vision of manhood that can only lead to their destruction.

Feminist critiques of the sexism and misogyny in gangsta rap, and in all aspects of popular culture, must continue to be bold and fierce. Black females must not be duped into supporting shit that hurts us under the guise of standing beside our men. If black men are betraying us through acts of male violence, we save ourselves and the race by resisting. Yet, our feminist critiques of black male sexism fail as meaningful political intervention if they seek to demonize black males, and do not recognize that our revolutionary work is to transform white supremacist capitalist patriarchy in the multiple areas of our lives where it is made manifest, whether in gangsta rap, the black church, or the Clinton administration.

Source: http://race.eserver.org/misogyny.html

Black Woman Pretends to be White

Unemployed Black Woman Pretends to be White, Job Offers Suddenly Skyrocket

 

If you don’t believe that racism in the job market is real, then please read this article by Yolanda Spivey.  Spivey, who was seeking work in the insurance industry, found that she wasn’t getting any job offers.  But as an experiment, she changed her name to Bianca White, to see if employers would respond differently.  You’ll be shocked and amazed by her phenomenal story. 

Before I begin, let me quote the late, great, Booker T. Washington who said, “Of all forms of slavery there is none that is so harmful and degrading as that form of slavery which tempts one human being to hate another by reason of his race or color.”

For two years, I have been unemployed.   In the beginning, I applied to more than three hundred open positions in the insurance industry—an industry that I’ve worked in for the previous ten years.  Not one employer responded to my resume.  So, I enrolled back into college to finish my degree. After completing school this past May, I resumed my search for employment and was quite shocked that I wasn’t getting a single response.   I usually applied for positions advertised on the popular website Monster.com. I’d used it in the past and have been successful in obtaining jobs through it.

Two years ago, I noticed that Monster.com had added a “diversity questionnaire” to the site.  This gives an applicant the opportunity to identify their sex and race to potential employers.  Monster.com guarantees that this “option” will not jeopardize your chances of gaining employment.  You must answer this questionnaire in order to apply to a posted position—it cannot be skipped.  At times, I would mark off that I was a Black female, but then I thought, this might be hurting my chances of getting employed, so I started selecting the “decline to identify” option instead.  That still had no effect on my getting a job.  So I decided to try an experiment:  I created a fake job applicant and called her Bianca White.

First, I created an email account and resume for Bianca.  I kept the same employment history and educational background on her resume that was listed on my own. But I removed my home phone number, kept my listed cell phone number, and changed my cell phone greeting to say, “You have reached Bianca White.  Please leave a message.” Then I created an online Monster.com account, listed Bianca as a White woman on the diversity questionnaire, and activated the account.

That very same day, I received a phone call.  The next day, my phone line and Bianca’s email address, were packed with potential employers calling for an interview.  I was stunned.  More shocking was that some employers, mostly Caucasian-sounding women, were calling Bianca more than once, desperate to get an interview with her.  All along, my real Monster.com account was open and active; but, despite having the same background as Bianca, I received no phone calls.    Two jobs actually did email me and Bianca at the same time.  But they were commission only sales positions.  Potential positions offering a competitive salary and benefits all went to Bianca.

At the end of my little experiment, (which lasted a week), Bianca White had received nine phone calls—I received none.  Bianca had received a total of seven emails, while I’d only received two, which again happen to have been the same emails Bianca received. Let me also point out that one of the emails that contacted Bianca for a job wanted her to relocate to a different state, all expenses paid, should she be willing to make that commitment.  In the end, a total of twenty-four employers looked at Bianca’s resume while only ten looked at mines.

Is this a conspiracy, or what? I’m almost convinced that White Americans aren’t suffering from disparaging unemployment rates as their Black counterpart because all the jobs are being saved for other White people.

My little experiment certainly proved a few things.  First, I learned that answering the diversity questionnaire on job sites such as Monster.com’s may work against minorities, as employers are judging whom they hire based on it.  Second, I learned to suspect that resumes with ethnic names may go into the wastebasket and never see the light of day.

Other than being chronically out of work, I embarked on this little experiment because of a young woman I met while I was in school.  She was a twenty-two-year-old Caucasian woman who, like myself, was about to graduate.  She was so excited about a job she had just gotten with a well-known sporting franchise.  She had no prior work experience and had applied for a clerical position, but was offered a higher post as an executive manager making close to six figures.  I was curious to know how she’d been able to land such a position.  She was candid in telling me that the human resource person who’d hired her just “liked” her and told her that she deserved to be in a higher position.  The HR person was also Caucasian.

Another reason that pushed me to do this experiment is because of the media. There’s not a day that goes by in which I fail to see a news program about how tough the job market is.  Recently, while I was watching a report on underemployed and underpaid Americans, I saw a middle aged White man complaining that he was making only $80,000 which was $30,000 less than what he was making before.  I thought to myself that in this economy, many would feel they’d hit the jackpot if they made 80K a year.

In conclusion, I would like to once again quote the late, great, Booker T. Washington when he said, “You can’t hold a man down without staying down with him.”

The more America continues to hold back great candidates based on race, the more our economy is going to stay in a rut.  We all need each other to prosper, flourish, and to move ahead.

Source: http://www.techyville.com/2012/11/news/unemployed-black-woman-pretends-to-be-white-job-offers-suddenly-skyrocket/#

Racism Is Still Alive

Racism Is Still Alive And Well Despite Black President

Photo by coolguyface

BREAKING NEWS: Because of Hurricane Sandy all events have been put on hold by President Obama and Mitt Romney. The President has to be the President in charge the next few days.

If you have kept up with race for President between President Barack Obama and former Gov. Mitt Romney then you know the issue of race has shown it’s ugly face again and it’s ugly folks. Real ugly.

People like former Gov. John Sununu, Ann Colter, the son of Sen. Tony Thompson, Sarah Palin and other folks have shown that just because we have had a African American President for the last four years it does not matter. Racism is alive and well in America and it is truly truly sad. And it upsets me.

Gen. Colin Powell came out the other day and again put his support behind the re-election of President Obama. Then Sununu who is one of Romney’s tops aides, came out and said the Powell is supporting the President because he is a fellow African American. That is a bunch of BS!!

Then Ann Culter calls the President a “retard” Also former Gov. Sarah Palin says the President needs to stop “shucking and jiving” A very racist term that goes back decades. And Sean Hannity has the NERVE to say the left is playing the so-called “race card”.

And Thompson’s son said in a meeting that he hopes the President will get beat so he can go back to Chicago or maybe Kenya!! This is TERRIBLE!! What kind of off the wall comment is this readers?

First of all readers, this term “race card” is ONLY used by non-people of color. You have never heard a African American bring out the term “race card” If you have PLEASE let me know. Why is this term used against black folks? It is just like the word “thug”. It is used almost 100% of the time against African Americans and people of color. This is real talk!!

And keep in mind folks that President Obama has been fighting racism since day one by Fox News and right wing radio hosts like Mike Savage, Laura Ingraham, Mike Medved, and even John Carlson here in Seattle. It has been this way since the President and his beautiful family moved into the White House.

Source: http://music.sportsinnercity.com/?p=6106

LOVE

There are Black Men who still love Black Women!

There is a belief that Black men, especially those who are successful, are no longer interested in Black women and that they desire women of other races. This thought process is perpetuated by the many brothas who work in Hollywood, the music industry, and professional sports that are dating women of other races. This thought is further validated through the number of college-educated brothas with great jobs who choose to date outside of their race.

Despite these public images which suggest that Black men are not interested in Black women, I can assure you that there is a large group of brothers who still love our Black queens. The media has never given our Black sistas a true platform to be appreciated and loved, so to expect that they would allow successful Black men to be seen with beautiful Black sistas would be wishful thinking. Outside of a few well-known couples, you hardly see Black couples on television (unless they are divorcing or in an unhealthy reality-show relationship).

As a successful Black man who is married to a beautiful Black queen, I would not have it any other way. A majority of my close friends, whom are all successful Black men, are either searching for, dating, or married to beautiful Black women. My purpose for writing this article is to say that we are out here sistas and we still love and appreciate you. Although some of us are married and are no longer available, there are a lot of good single brothas in the world.

By no means am I against interracial relationships. Actually, it is my belief that every person should be with the one who makes them happy. My stance is that I strive to promote positive Black love because most of the major media platforms do not depict Black love in a positive light, nor do they give significant air time to successful Black couples.

As a race we have to do a better job of showcasing our love for each other. This means that as Black men, we need to make sure that we verbally express our love and appreciation for our sistas and display it through our actions. For Black women, this means that you have to trust and believe that there are good brothas in this world and you cannot generalize us all as being unsupportive and unloving. If we work together, we can rebuild what society has been trying to take away from us….healthy Black love.

About the Author: Dr. Corey Guyton is a dynamic speaker, blogger, author, and husband who is on a mission to bring back the essence of healthy relationships. Alongside his wife, Dr. Chutney Guyton, their movement has gained momentum and they strive daily to be an example of positive Black love. Follow Dr. Guyton on twitter! @coreyguyton

The purpose of His Story is to tell the stories of Black Men young and old through videos and written work. Too often the story of Black Men is told by everyone else. His Story will be the catalyst to allow Black Men & Women to provide the positive contradiction to the prevailing Black male image of today.

Source: http://theblackmancan.org/?p=3023

Take Em’ To Church

 

 

May The Church Say Amen …

The religion institutes squeezes money out of the people by selling them an absurd vision of the world in which all is good and divine. Religions are physical slavery; it is a well-built corporation that steals human spirituality in a systematic, fascistic, fashion. Religion teaches slave-morality, just like the mass media, just like the Hollywood propaganda. The religion institutes are a spiritua

lly bankrupt organization because it treats human beings like customers to whom it sells false, decrepit, hopes. Religion stands in the way of salvation by stealing human resources and using them to buy gold, land and stocks. Religion uses sophisticated propaganda techniques in order to get the populace to believe that a mythic creature in the sky will save them.